Henar’s work experience with us

10 June 2019

Henar with a child in the Sensory Room

 

Henar with a child in the Sensory Room
Henar helps a little boy with a sensory aid in the Sensory Room

 

“I wanted to see what my little brother gets up to all day!”

That’s one of the reasons why Henar chose to spend her work experience week at CPotential. Henar, 16, attends Dwight School in Friern Barnet and her brother has been coming to CPotential for three years.

She says, “It was also a good opportunity to learn more about how CPotential helps children with disabilities like my brother.”

As well as spending time with him in his classes  – “I think I was a bit of a distraction!” – Henar sat in with the nursery class, an occupational therapy session and a sensory integration session.

She also got to see how we deliver Conductive Education to help each child be as active as possible. “It was interesting to see how the children react to the activities and how they make progress.”

The experience may well be useful going forward as Henar is interested in studying psychology. Maybe she’ll be back one day with us in a professional capacity!

Ruth’s Top Tips 3: Chilling out

15 February 2019

Scrabble letters spelling out QUIET

Scrabble letters spelling out QUIET

Music therapy is a dynamic way to use music making and singing to help disabled children grow and develop in lots of ways.

For instance, depending on the child, music therapy can help with their skills using their voice and speech, interacting with other children and adults, using their hands, managing their emotions – and generally feeling good about themselves.

Here, in the last of our current mini-series of top tips, are three simple ways, based on music therapy techniques, that you might like to try at home with your child to help you both relax and enjoy some quiet time together.

 

Personalise songs

Adapt the words of a favourite or well-known song to include your child’s name. It’s a lovely way to settle them before bed or when they need some comfort.

For example, for little children adapt the tune of Frère Jacques:

 

‘Little (child’s name), Little (child’s name),

Where are you? Where are you?

Sitting on the sofa. Sitting on the sofa.

We love you. Yes we do’

 

For older children, try Olly Murs’ Just The Way You Are:

When I see your face there’s not a thing that I would change

‘Cos you’re amazing, just the way you are.

And when you smile the whole world stops and stares for a while

‘Cos (child’s name) you’re amazing, just the way you are.

 

 

Too much noise?

How much noise is there at any one time in your home?  You might have the dishwasher on, the radio and a TV all at the same time.  Some noise in the midst of family life is of course unavoidable but sometimes it may be too stimulating for your child, especially if they have difficulties processing sensory input.

In music therapy we give a lot of thought to the overall sound environment that children experience as some children can be very sensitive to the sounds around them.

So you might like to think about the noises your child is exposed to every day and whether anything can be turned down or off.

 

Chilling out together

Why not find the odd 20 minutes with no distractions where you dim the lights and sit quietly with your child and watch and listen to them in a restful state?

Watch the rise and fall of their chest and listen to the rhythm of their breathing.

Try this with no background music or something gentle and soothing like Pachelbel’s Canon in D.

 

Try any of these tips and tell us it goes.  And here’s our short video showing how music therapy helps disabled children.

Ruth Hunston

Ruth Hunston

CPotential Music Therapist

Ruth’s Top Tips 2: Let’s get musical

24 January 2019

Pots and pans

Pots and pans

Music therapy is a dynamic way to use music making and singing to help disabled children grow and develop in lots of ways.

For instance, music therapy can a child with skills such as using their voice and speech, interacting with other children and adults, using their hands, managing their emotions and generally supporting their confidence and wellbeing.

Here are three simple music making ideas you might like to try at home to help your child with their communication and confidence.

 

Have your own Karoake Bar

Singing is a great way, especially for non-verbal children, to express themselves and develop confidence.

What are your child’s favourite songs? Join them listening to them (even if it’s Taylor Swift over and over again).

If you’ve got a toy microphone (or just a pretend one) sing along, taking turns to sing a verse and then sing the chorus together. You can share your favourite songs too – have a party!

 

Bang a pan or two

Choose a song with a strong beat that you all like, grab some pots and wooden spoons from the kitchen and play along.

All that banging will be helping your child with their basic rhythm skills, hand-eye coordination – and is very stimulating.

 

Go to gigs

For a more professional musical experience, take in a concert. Most classical orchestras have interactive, inclusive family days and concerts – check out your nearest venues and see what’s on offer.

Try these tips and tell us it goes.  And here’s our short video showing how music therapy helps disabled children.

 Ruth Hunston

Ruth Hunston

CPotential Music Therapist

 

Ruth’s Top Tips 1: Be silly

15 January 2019

Bowl of raspberries

Music therapy is a dynamic way to use music making and singing to help disabled children grow and develop in lots of ways. 

It can help a child with skills such as using their voice and speech, interacting with other children and adults, using their hands, managing their emotions and generally supporting their confidence and wellbeing.

Here are three simple music making techniques you might like to try at home to help your child with their vocal sounds and social interaction.

 

Be silly

Making silly or rude noises – blowing raspberries, making squeaks and whoops – can really encourage children to use their voices.

Look at each other in a mirror as seeing the silly faces can add to the fun and also help children to develop their social understanding.

 

Call and response

Whatever sounds your child is making – babbling, humming, blowing bubbles – copy the sounds back to them and see how they respond.

This may lead to a conversation where you use sounds and gestures instead of words.

The sense of give and take, of listening, responding and waiting can be lots of fun. And it can help you to connect with your child without the need for language.

 

Sing-and-touch songs

Good old-fashioned nursery rhymes like This Little Piggy, Round and Round the Garden, Pop Goes the Weasel are a great way to have fun and stimulate your child’s responses.

Young children really enjoy the feeling of anticipation and resolution of the rhymes and the element of touch through gentle tickling or stroking also helps children’s motor skills and awareness of their bodies.

Try these and tell us it goes.  More tips coming soon…

And here’s our short video showing how music therapy helps disabled children.

 

Ruth Hunston

Ruth Hunston

CPotential Music Therapist

 

 

Search the site:

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.

You have Successfully Subscribed!